News from the Archive - Recent Projects


Oddball Films is letting you in on some of our most recent stock footage projects in film, television, commercials and more.  Recent highlights include providing offbeat footage for the credits for the Emmy nominated series Transparent, The New York Times, Ray Donovan as well as the documentary series OJ: Made in America and We've Been Around about transgender trailblazers. We also did research for Jim Jarmusch’s Iggy Pop documentary Gimme Danger, retro-tech for Danny Boyle’s Academy Award nominated Steve Jobs. And wouldn’t you know it?  They came to us when they wanted some 70s smut for The Nice Guys, Ryan Gosling’s latest movie! 

Strange Sinema 102: Experiments in Electronic Arts - Fri. July 29th - 8PM

Oddball Films presents Strange Sinema 102, a monthly evening of newly discovered, old finds and rarities from the stacks of the archive. Drawing on his collection of over 50,000 16mm film prints, Oddball Films director Stephen Parr has compiled his 102nd program of classic, strange, offbeat and unusual films. This installment, Strange Sinema 102: Experiments in Electronic Arts is a heady, techno-cultural look at the art, sound and early electronic art forms that jump-started the 60s and transformed the way we create and experience art and technology. Films feature documentaries that survey tech art and music innovators as well as experimental and avant garde shorts showcasing early analog and computer assisted animation and graphics.  Art For Tomorrow (1969) is an eye-popping exploration of experimental tech-oriented art incorporating early IBM computers, cybernetics, heart beat triggers, invisible art by magnetism featuring famed artists such as Yaacov Agam, Wen-Ying Tsai, John Mott-Smith, Jean Tinguely and Victor Vasarely’s early experiments with IBM computers. Get in a moogy kind of mood with Discovering Electronic Music (1983) an introduction to the synthesizers and computers used to create electronic music, including the legendary Fairlight CMI, one of the first sampling synthesizers used in music production. Bell Laboratories brings us Incredible Machine (1968) which previews the latest developments in computer-assisted imagery, electronic music, and voice processing. Catalog (1961) features computer graphics pioneer and cinema innovator John Whitney’s kaleidoscopic demo reel made with equipment salvaged from WWII. Ken Rudolph takes us through the history of Art in eight pulsing minutes in Gallery (1969) with electronic music sound score by Clockwork Orange composer Wendy Carlos. We follow that up with the astonishing Peter Foldes' Hunger (1974), one of the first computer-generated animated shorts and a metamorphic nightmare of greed, gluttony and lust. Languid rhythms of fades, dissolves and superimpositions permeate 7362 (1967) a masterful avant-garde film by the auteur of the optical printer (and sometime Star Wars special effects wiz) Pat O’Neill. Experiments in Motion Graphics (1968) once again features early computer motion graphics by John Whitney and a discussion of the computers prospect as an art making tool. Plus! The Critic (1963), an animated Oscar winner from the great Ernie Pintoff with comedy legend Mel Brooks relentlessly ragging on the experimental animation he's shown to hilarious effect.



Date: Friday, July 29th, 2016 at 8:00pm
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilms.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com


Cinema Soiree: Jim Morton on East German Genre Films - Thur. July 28th - 8PM

Oddball Films welcomes back Author and Film Historian Jim Morton for our Cinema Soiree Series, a monthly soiree featuring visiting authors, filmmakers and curators presenting and sharing cinema insights. Film historian and editor of ReSearch’s Incredibly Strange Films, Morton has turned his attention to the films of East Germany and discovered that they are every bit as odd as anything from the West. He will be at Oddball Films for one night only to discuss the films of the former German Democratic Republic, with clips from some of his favorites. Some of these films have not yet been released in United States. Some may never be. Here’s your chance to see what was going on behind the Berlin Wall. Morton's previous soiree sold out, and he's finally returned with a second helping of all new weird and wonderful clips. This time he is taking on genre films in the GDR, with all-new clips of everything from westerns to musicals. Here’s the story of the topsy-turvy world of red westerns where the Indians are the good guys, and spy films, where the United States plots world domination. Learn the tragic story of Dean Reed, the American pop singer who become known as the “Red Elvis”; discover the secret world of underground filmmaking that flourished beyond the reach of the government. The classic film genres of musicals and film noir are also revisited in all new clips. Selections include the musical No Cheating Darling (1972), the Western Blood Brothers (1975), spy flic For Eyes Only (1963), the Film Noir The Story of a Murder (1965), bizarro children's fantasy The Tinderbox (1959), the juvenile delinquents of Berlin, Schoenhauser Corner (1957), punk documentary Winter Adé and the rare underground piece Konrad, the Mom Said. If you’re not familiar with the strange world of East German cinema, you’re in for a treat.

Date: Thursday, July 28th, 2016 at 8:00pm
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilms.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

Oddball in the Press

People love to talk about us! From the Huffington Post to the SF Weekly, our massive collection and unique screenings have impressed, baffled, and inspired folks all over the world. Read what they're saying about the country's strangest film archive. 


Vintage Burlesque Bonanza! - Fri. July 22nd - 8PM


Oddball Films presents Vintage Burlesque Bonanza!, a titillating night of burlesque beauties, oddities, and even animation from the 1930s-1950s all screened on 16mm film from the archive.  These erotic and exotic artifacts of yesterday are tame by today's standards, but offer us a view into the buttoned-up sexuality of the mid-century man. The night features an array of lovely ladies (and a few strapping men) including the burlesque queens Sally Rand, Faith Bacon, Lili St. Cyr, Betty Dolan and more with more bubble and fan dances than you can handle. Behold the battle of the bubbles with three interpretations of bodacious bubbles including Lili St. Cyr in a tantalizing Bubble Bath Dance (1952) and the ethereal and breathtaking Bubble Dance with Sally Rand (1942), which is parodied in the all-star Merrie Melodies cartoon Hollywood Steps Out (1934), which we will also be screening. Get into the fan dance, originated by Faith Bacon as a way around Broadway censors in Faith Bacon: A Lady with Fans (1950s), and see Sally Rand as she displays the erotic dance at the World's Fair in Streets of Paris (1933), then see another cartoon interpretation in the super rarity Krazy Kat Frogs and Kats (1930s) featuring an old perv with x-ray machine trying to see Miss Kitty nude. Burlesque gets a little bizarre with our next three favorites: a marionette out-strips a stripper in Doll Dance (1940s), The Fabulous Cat Girl (1950s) will scratch her way into your heart, and Betty Dolan fights off her Satanic side in Satan Tease (1950s). Meet the Sweethearts of Burlesque including "Sensational Sandra Storm in Action" (1941),   "Sweethearts of Burlesque" (1948) with Pat Dorsey, Lorraine Lee and Pat O'Connor,"Three Party Girls" (1930) with three gal pals going to a costume party who accidentally burn their outfits with an iron, "Betty Rowland in The Magic Bottle" (1950),  featuring Betty dancing in a bottle on a nightclub bar with lots of old time-y special effects and camera tricks,  "Caught Without Costume" (1930) with a lovely lady who goes skinny dipping, loses her clothes to a pervy dog and has to cover up with a barrel, and "Hunting Bare" (1930s) with three gals out on a hunting trip who mark their path with discarded clothing. And we couldn't let the girls have all the fun, so we're pulling out some fabulous Vintage Beefcake Shorts with handsome young men stripping down and shaking their stuff: Amateur Strip (1960s) and the homegrown homoerotica The Groping Hand (1960s) featuring a groovy soundtrack and shots of 1960s North Beach. So strap on your tassels, grab your fan and blow some bubbles, because it's a scintillating night of stripteases and sensuality at San Francisco's strangest film archive.

Date: Friday, July 22nd, 2016 at 8:00pm
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

Humanimation - Stop-Motion Pixilation - Thur. July 21st - 8PM

Oddball Films presents Humanimation: Stop-Motion Pixilation, a super fun and funny program of stop-motion animation utilizing human actors as puppets, animated one frame at a time.  Films include four shorts from Academy Award winning luminary Norman McLaren and the National Film Board of Canada: Neighbors (1952) a grim tale of two men feuding over a beautiful flower, Two Bagatelles (1953) with two delightful tales of men dancing and flying over a field of grass, A Chairy Tale (1957) featuring music by Ravi Shankar, and his hilarious Opening Speech (1961) with an out of control microphone. From the hilarious and Oscar-nominated duo Leo Janson and Chuck Menville come four raucous shorts of speed racers without their cars in Stop Look and Listen (1967), cowpokes without their horses in the Western spoof Blaze Glory (1969), bikers without their motorcycles in Vicious Cycles (1967), and high-flying superheroes in Captain Mom (1972).  Other films include Mike Jitlov's eye-popping high-speed chase The Wizard of Speed and Time (1979), the Encyclopedia Britannica short Let's Pretend: Magic Sneakers (1969) featuring a high speed pair of enchanted Converse, and a section of Six Filmmakers in Search of a Wedding (1971). Plus more! All films screened on 16mm from our stock footage archive.

Date: Thursday, July 21st, 2016 at 8:00pm
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

Learn your Lesson Plays in Traffic - The Bloody Road to Shockucation - Fri. July 15th - 8PM

Oddball Films and curator Kat Shuchter present Learn Your Lesson Plays in Traffic: The Bloody Road to Shockucation, the 40th in a monthly series of programs highlighting the most ridiculous, insane and camptastic educational films, mental hygiene primers and TV specials of the collection. This month we're heading out on the highway to hell with a truckload of gory and kitschy pedestrian and driver safety scare films from the 1930s - 80s including tons of new discoveries from the archive. There will be dolls flying through windshields, little boys in pantaloons, animated drunk driving foibles, an appearance by Raymond Burr, and (of course) blood on the highway! Films include Signal 30 (1959, excerpt), the notorious driver scare film from Dick Wayman and the first to feature footage of real accidents. Industrial film giant Jam Handy and General Motors team up for Safety Patrol (1937) featuring an annoying school crossing guard and his bff, a 65 year-old police sergeant (who lures him underground). Look Alive! (1961) with your host Raymond Burr as we see the POV of a victim of a pedestrian accident. Dad gambled with his life and lost in the melodramatic Technicolor cheesefest Anatomy of an Accident (1962) from Jerry Fairbanks (the man that previously brought us singing bears and harem dogs from the Speaking of Animals series). See a history of drunk drivers through the ages in the short animation A Snort History (1971). A little girl's doll gets the crash-test dummy treatment in the ridiculous Safety Belt for Susie (1962). Boozed up test subjects hit a staged parking lot and tons of ludicrous driving is documented in Alco Beat (1965). And for the early birds, a 24 year-old Scott Baio plays a high school senior with a bright future, but a bad habit of drinking and driving in the CBS Schoolbreak Special All The Kids Do It (1984, directed by Henry "The Fonz" Winkler). So drive on down to Oddball and learn your lesson. Everything screened on 16mm film from our stock footage archive.

Date: Friday, July 15th, 2016 at 8:00pm
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com