Fantasmes Français - Fresh French Discoveries - Thur. Mar. 5th - 8PM

Oddball Films presents Fantasmes Français with an almost entirely newly-unearthed slate of marvelous and award-winning French shorts from the likes of Pierre Etaix, Claude Berri, Jean Mitry, Robert Enrico, and Jean L'Hôte. This multi-genred program features everything from farce to experimental to animation with chilling, heart-warming, hilarious and animated shorts dug out of our 40,000 16mm film archive. The hilarious Pierre Etaix wrote, directed and stars in the delightful vampire tale Insomnie (1963).  Claude Berri's Cannes and Oscar-winning Le Poulet (1965) tells the whimsical story of a young boy trying to save a chicken from becoming dinner.  Robert Enrico's Chickamauga (1962) is a brilliant, dark and surreal retelling of Ambrose Bierce's civil war story of a deaf-mute boy's interpretation of one of the bloodiest battles in the American Civil War.  A man gets trapped inside a rather-huge church bell and wreaks havoc and hilarity all over Paris in Jean L'Hôte's silent-inspired slapstick farce La Cloche (1964). Jean Mitry gives us a symphony of locomotive and musical artistry in the beautiful avant-garde piece Pacific 231 (1949). And for a little abstract French animation, we have a double shot of Oscar-nominated animator Jean-Charles Meunier, Hypothèse Beta (1967) and The Glob Family (1970).  Early birds will be treated to another Oscar-winning delight One Eyed Men Are Kings (1974).   


Date: Thursday, March 5th, 2015 at 8:00PM
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com 

Learn Your Lesson's 2-Year Anniversary: Shockucation's Greatest Hits - Fri. Mar. 6th - 8PM

Oddball Films and curator Kat Shuchter present Learn Your Lesson... 2 Year Anniversary: Shockucation's Greatest Hits, the 25th in a monthly series of programs highlighting the most ridiculous, insane and camptastic educational films, mental hygiene primers and TV specials of the collection. After 24 months of digging out the best and worst the archive has to offer, we are celebrating our 2 Year Anniversary with a sampler of all our favorite lessons thus far including sex, drugs, and the creepiest of creepy puppets. Get rappin' about fast food and vegetables in the gut-busting craptacular Fast Food: What's in it for You? (1988).  Watch out for easy girls on the street, they just might be hankering to give you VD, in an itchy excerpt from our favorite syphilitic scare film, The Innocent Party (1958). Teen girls need to watch out for intruders, even when they inexplicably become your instructor of Self-Defense for Girls (1969).  What better way to learn not to drink the poisons in your medicine cabinet than to have the bottles sing to you in the baffling mini-cartoon musical Sniffy Escapes Poisoning (1967).  Or learn about poisons with Egbert, one puppet boy with a penchant for poisoning himself over and over again in Watch Out for Poison (1970s). And yet, the creepiest puppet award goes to the clown puppet that will turn you invisible to see all your long-suffering parents do for you in the comically-dubbed Parents: Who Needs Them? (1971). Mike Miller is a good Mormon Boy, but will he be lured by fast cars and wild women in the hilarious Measure of a Man (1962) from Mormon-mental hygiene pioneer Wetzel Whitaker. NFL great and needlepoint enthusiast Rosey Grier sings "It's Alright to Cry" from Free to Be...You and Me (1974) for all those boys questioning the masculinity of emotions.  Three pubescent girls lament about their underdeveloped bodies in an uncomfortable musical number "The Itty Bitty Titty Committee" from Junior High School (1978).  See historical women through the ages not-talk about their menstrual pains in the opening segment of Cramps! (1983). And even more surprises and snippets!   



Date: Friday, March 6th, 2014 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

The Kiss of Death - A Menage a Murder - Fri. Mar. 13 - 8PM

Oddball Films and curator Kat Shuchter present The Kiss of Death - A Menage a Murder, a program of 16mm films about the dark side of love and the romantic side of death in honor of Friday the 13th. It's a chilling and thrilling night of obsession, infidelity, and homicide all lovingly culled from the archive and starring Alfred Hitchcock, Dean Stockwell, Orson Welles, Peter Cushing and Susannah York with adaptations of works by Patricia Highsmith, Ambrose Bierce, Edgar Allan Poe and Honore de Balzac. Dean Stockwell stars in an epically creepy episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour - Annabel (1962), based on a Patricia Highsmith story and adapted by Psycho screenwriter Robert Bloch.  Stockwell's obsession for his ex-girlfriend leads to lies, double lives, stalking, murder, and an unbelievable ending.  And from one Annabel obsession to another; Edgar Allan Poe's melancholic love poem Annabel Lee (1971) evokes the ghosts of lost love. Peter Cushing and Susannah York star in a disturbing (and super rare) Balzac adaptation La Grande Bretèche (1973) from Orson Welles' Great Mysteries. From Robert Enrico comes the brilliant (and Oscar-winning) adaptation of Ambrose Bierce's haunting tale about the final romantic thoughts of a condemned man, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (1962).  Plus, Grant Munro's blood-sucking anti-smoking short Ashes of Doom (1970), excerpts of The Devil (1920s) French silent smut starring Satan himself, the outrageous James Thurber adaptation Mr. Preble Gets Rid of His Wife (1981) for the early birds, and more surprises. Bring someone you love, or someone you'd like to murder.

Date: Friday, March 13th, 2015 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

Cinema Soiree with Intermedia Artist Elise Baldwin - Thur. Mar. 19 - 8PM

Oddball Films welcomes intermedia artist Elise Baldwin to our Cinema Soiree, a monthly soiree featuring visiting authors, filmmakers and curators presenting and sharing cinema insights and films. Elise Baldwin is an intermedia performer and sound artist whose live cinematic works center around themes of natural history, collective memory and relationships between technology and the natural world. Using custom software instruments, physical props and circuitry, she often combines and manipulates original and archival recordings. She will be presenting two recent audio-visual works The Philosophy of Storms (2014) will be performed live and a multi-sensory circus experiment Hippodrome (2007).


Date: Thursday, March 19th, 2015 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com


Strange Sinema 85: Dada and Post-Modern Surrealism (The Land of the Melting Watches) - Fri. Feb. 27 - 8PM

Oddball Films presents Strange Sinema 85,  a once monthly evening of newly discovered and avant-garde rarities from the stacks of the archive. Drawing on his collection of over 50,000 16mm film prints, Oddball Films director Stephen Parr has compiled his 85th program of classic, strange, offbeat and unusual films. This installment, Strange Sinema 85: Dada and Post-Modern Surrealism (The Land of the Melting Watches) features an eye-popping exploration of Dada and Surrealism including Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray’s stunning Anemic Cinema (1926), a visual cacophony of hypnotic puns;  L’Etoile des Mer aka The Sea Star (1928) Man Ray’s haunting, dreamlike ode to subconscious sexual desire;  Greta Deses’s  rarely screened Dada(1967), an astonishing profile of the dada movement featuring live performances, film excerpts, interviews and a live performance reenactment of the groundbreaking Cabaret Voltaire with Jean Arp playing the piano. The film features in-person appearances by Marcel Duchamp, a very rare and a eye-opening interview with the legendary Man Ray and much, much more. Other films include the legendary eyeball-slitting surrealist masterpiece Un Chien Andalou (1928) by Salvador Dali and Luis Bunuel; Orson Welles first experiments with surrealism-The Hearts of Age (1934); and post-modern shorts including Carson Davidson’s award-winning beatnik dada rhapsody Help! My Snowman’s Burning Down (1964) with jazz score by the Gerry Mulligan Quartet; Bill Plympton’s screwy award-winning animated Your Face (1987); and the jaw-dropping psychedelia-inspired surrealist animation of Fantasy (1971) by San Francisco filmmaker Vince Collins. Plus! The Salvador Dali-inspired cartoon Dough For the Do-Do (1949), a tribute to surrealism starring Porky Pig.



Date: Friday, February 27th, 2015 at 8:00PM
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com 

Sonic Cinema Soiree with David Michalak and Live Sound Scores by Reel Change - Thur. Feb. 26 - 8PM

Oddball Films welcomes veteran filmmaker and visionary musician David Michalak and his sound score based experimental music group Reel Change to our Cinema Soiree a monthly soiree featuring visiting authors, filmmakers and curators presenting and sharing cinema insights and films. During this program, Sonic Cinema, David will be discussing, composing, collaborating and creating soundscores for his films, showing film clips, and offering unique technical and creative insights into the process. He will also curate a collection of his original films including Life is a Serious Business, starring the late great George Kuchar; Inside Out, featuring the Kate Foley Dance Company with a score performed by the Clubfoot Orchestra; Once a Face, an animated portrait of the filmmaker; Who Stole the Keeshka?, a cine-seance to contact the other side.   The second half of the program will feature experimental musicians Reel Change creating live scores for films. Reel change is composed of SF Bay Area musical luminaries Doug Carroll (cello), Tom Nunn (inventions), Andrew  Voigt (winds) and David Michalak (lap steel). Films with live scores include Regenbogen, an animated finger-painting using vaseline and lame’ as materials; Not Quite Right, an expressionistic tale a man creates the world he fears; Firefly, an animated look inside exploding embers and the groundbreaking film Meshes in the Afternoon by Maya Deren.


Date: Thursday, February 26th, 2015 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com

Yesterday's Tomorrow - A Night of Past Futures - Fri. Feb. 20 - 8PM


Oddball Films and guest curator Christina Yglesias present Yesterday's Tomorrow: A Night of Past Futures. The program features an eclectic mix of future prediction films brought to you from the 20th century. There will be humans living on other planets, environmental destruction, the predecessor to OkCupid, personal computers that kill, automatic kitchens, cyborgs, time travel, and more! Whether laughable or eerily spot-on, these future visions will have you thinking about the past, the present, the future, and everything in between. First up, IT beat cops investigate of string of personal computer related injuries and murders in Signal Syntax (1983). With quotes like, "Give me that floppy disk. You're too drunk to compute now!" and a distraught, "IF ONLY I HAD READ MY MANUAL!” this low-budget compu-horror will be sure to please. Ugly Little Boy (1977), an Isaac Asimov adaptation, brings us a surprisingly heart-wrenching story of the connection formed between a neanderthal baby brought from the past through time travel and the nurse tasked with caring for him. Keeping with the heart-breaking sci-fi theme, All Summer in a Day (1982) is a Bradbury adaptation that takes place on a planet that only sees the sun every 9 years. In an excerpt from Eager Minds (1955), we get a glimpse into the fifties kitchen of the future and predictions of  "video phones.” Catalog (1961) is a mesmerizing example of early analog computer animation from cinematic innovator John Whitney; created with his analog computer/film/camera machine he built from a WWII anti-aircraft gun sight. Tying it all up is Stranger than Science Fiction (1968). CBS News and Walter Cronkite made time in a pivotal year of American history to finish this report on the technologies of the world and how closely they resemble visions of the future that had been previously erected. For early arrivals, there is The Future (1980), which offers up three (equally dystopian) visions of the future world.


Date: Friday, February 20th, 2015 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com


Dangerous Dames and Brutal Beauties - Thurs. Feb. 19 - 8PM

Oddball Films presents Dangerous Dames and Brutal Beauties, a 16mm program of witches, temptresses, murderesses, vampires, brawling convicts, derby dolls and more fearsome femmes.  Ida Lupino directs a witchy episode of Boris Karloff's Thriller - La Strega (1962), starring a then-unknown Ursula Andress who must shake her witchy past to fall in love with a handsome stranger. This tragic romance features palpable chemistry between Andress and Alejandro Rey, Jeanette Nolan's scene-stealing performance as one of the most authentically creepy witches ever with her coven of interpretive dancing witches, and (of course) loving close-ups of Andress' gorgeous face. Oscar winner Marie Dressler thwarts an escaped convict (or is it an Evangelist?) in the hilarious early talkie Dangerous Females (1929). Marlene Dietrich proves she has beauty and brawn when she belts out a tune and then belts a lady in a bar-brawl in an excerpt of Destry Rides Again (1939).  Private Eye Daffy Duck goes head to head with a red-headed and yellow-beaked femme fatale in The Super Snooper (1952). Gracie Barrie sings about matrimonial crimes of passion in the delightfully off-beat Soundie Stone Cold Dead in the Market (1946). Watch an all-lady prison riot in a dynamic excerpt of award-winning women's prison movie Caged (1950) and derby dolls face off in the rink in clips of vintage Roller Derby (1956), plus The Battle of the Burlesque Queens (1948) and more surprises.  Come early for Glynis Johns in the made-for-tv vampire tale Mrs. Amworth (1975). 


Date: Thursday, February 19th, 2015 at 8:00pm 
Venue: Oddball Films, 275 Capp Street San Francisco
Admission: $10.00 Limited Seating RSVP to RSVP@oddballfilm.com or (415) 558-8117
Web: http://oddballfilms.blogspot.com